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Data Results

614 Cafe Worker

The Salvation Army worked with a further 2,591 clients through non-SHS Salvation Army homelessness services, bringing the total number of clients across Australia in the six-month period to 22,594 (Table 1).

The Salvation Army operates 155 homelessness centres [12] across Australia. The majority of these (78%) are required to report their data as part of the SHS collection [13] while the remaining 22% are collected internally by The Salvation Army.

Fifty-one per cent of Salvation Army homelessness services were located in Victoria and accounted for 64% of clients assisted by The Salvation Army (Table 1) [14].

Table 1.

The Salvation Army (TSA) homelessness clients and centres (July – December 2012) 

client and centre distribution across states

Client centre distribution across states

The Salvation Army provides a diverse range of services to people who are at risk of, or experiencing, homelessness. These include crisis, transitional and longer term accommodation, along with a range of other material aid and non-material support such as information, advice, advocacy, referral and case management. Salvation Army homelessness services are often co-located with other programs to offer clients continuing wrap around holistic support.

Figure 1

Services by Type (%) - General Homelessness, Women’s Services and Youth Services

Services by type


The Salvation Army operates homelessness services that specifically focus on target populations such as women (and their children) and youth (if they have children). A quarter (25%) of Salvation Army homelessness services are specifically for women experiencing, or at risk of, homelessness. A further quarter (26%) of Salvation Army homelessness programs are youth specific (Figure 1).

Figure 2

Sex of clients by state

Sex of clients by state

Figure 3

Sex - national distribution

Sex national distribution

Across the nation, breakdown by sex varied between states and territories (Figure 2), however, nationally it was exactly 50-50 (Figure 3). The majority (95%) of Salvation Army homeless clients who identified where they were born, were born in Australia.

Figure 4

National Age Distribution 

National Age Distribution

Nationally, the majority of clients were aged between 20 to 50 years (65%). Clients under 15 years were children accompanying a parent or legal guardian and also received support services (Figure 4).

Figure 5

Proportion of Salvation Army clients who identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Clients

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were significantly over represented across Salvation Army services in comparison to the total population. Nationally, nearly 13% of clients accessing Salvation Army services, who provided information on their indigenous status, identified themselves as either Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. This compares to indigenous people representing 3% of the total Australian population [15] (Figure 5).

At a state and territory level,Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were also consistently over represented, especially in South Australia and Queensland. In South Australia, 30% of clients who answered questions about their indigenous status identified as either Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, compared with 1.7% of the total population in South Australia In Queensland, 26% identified themselves as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, compared to 3.6 % of the total Queensland population (Figure 5).

[11] Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.Specialist homelessness services July – December 2012. Available: www.aihw.gov.au
[12] See data note 10
[13] See data note 3
[14] See data note 13
[15] Australian Bureau of Statistics. Estimates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, June 2011. Available: http://www.abs.gov.au